Concert info for DC Presentations

Anniversary Vignette #10

World War II – V.E. Day – May 08, 1945

 

 
                The Second World War ended on May 08, 1945.  As we approach the 57th anniversary of that day, it is appropriate to reflect upon the profound effects that it had on the congregations of Dominion and Chalmers United Churches.  (The effects of World War I will be reviewed in November.) 

    

    On the home front, both churches had “War Service Units” whose annual reports summarized their work on behalf of the men and women from the congregation who had joined the armed forces.  Each year these units contributed over one thousand knitted articles, packed Christmas comforts for service men and women overseas, prepared surgical dressings and other materials for the Red Cross, and collected new and used clothing for bomb victims in England.   An Honour Roll naming members who had enlisted in the Army, Navy or Air Force Annual was presented at each Annual Meeting of the two congregations between 1940 and 1945 and those killed or missing in action were memorialized.  

       

    The ministers and various committees of the two congregations were also active in supporting the greatly increased numbers of military and civilian personnel in Ottawa as well as the family members of those serving overseas.

       

    At Chalmers Church, Dr. J.W. Woodside made a room available

for servicemen who wanted a quiet place to read, write letters or rest . Dominion United Church served as the headquarters for the Canadian Victory Loan Campaign. 

                Many young men and women from Dominion and Chalmers United Churches served in all three branches of the Armed Forces during the 1939-1945 war.  The names of those from both churches whose lives were sacrificed, as well as of those from Dominion Church who served in the Armed Forces are preserved in the Memorial Tablets that are now located in the sanctuary of Dominion-Chalmers United Church.   The names of all service men and women from Chalmers are listed on the illuminated scroll in the narthex.   An additional tablet, now in the chancel, was commissioned by the Chalmers Choir and dedicated on February 16, 1947 in memory of the four choir members who were killed in the war.

 

      


Photograph by George MacManus 

      

    In partial fulfillment of the pledge that “We will remember them”, brief notes have been prepared about the young men of our founding churches who died in the service of their country during World War II.   These notes are based on the collection of War Service Records in the archives of Chalmers Church, some of which included informative newspaper clippings.   The notes for servicemen from Dominion United Church were presumably destroyed in the 1961 fire.  

       

       To preserve as much information as possible as memorials to the young men from Dominion and Chalmers Churches whose lives were sacrificed during the Second World War, Wib Neal or Garth Bray would welcome additional information about them or their families.  The information will be preserved in the Dominion-Chalmers Archives.                                                      

 

Sources:

World War II Service Records, Chalmers United Church

Annual Reports, 1940 – 1945, Dominion United Church

Year Books, 1940 – 1945, Chalmers United Church

Second World War Service Files: Canadian Armed Forces War Dead, database at Library & Archives Canada.                                             

 

                                                                                 

 

Honour Roll
Members or Adherents of Dominion United Church
:

 

                                            

 

       Flying Officer James L. Eagleson, age 21, was killed on September 01, 1944.  He was buried in the churchyard at Bezinghem, a small village in the Pas-Nord-de-Calais region of France.  His parents and wife lived in Ottawa.

       Lieutenant Keith D. Faris, 31, was serving with the Canadian Army in Italy when he was killed on May 24, 1944.  He was buried in the Casino War Cemetery.  Lt. Faris was a B.A. (Hons) graduate of the University of Toronto.   His parents lived in Bradford, Ontario.

       Flight Sergeant John B. Jamieson, 25, was killed on November 28, 1942.  He was buried in the Burton- on-the-Woods Burial Ground, Leicestershire, England.  His parents lived in Ottawa.

       Pilot Officer Ross E. MacFarlane, was killed on May 04, 1944.  He was buried in the Breuvery-sur-Coole Churchyard, Mame, France.

       Captain William W. K. MacPhail, 24, was serving with the Governor General’s Foot Guards, R.C.A.C. when he was killed on August 22, 1944 during the invasion of France.  He was buried in the Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery, Calvados, France.  His parents lived in Ottawa.

       Pilot Officer John R. Marriott, 26, was killed on April 27, 1943, presumably while on a mission over Germany.   He was buried in the Reichswald Forest War Cemetery, Nordrhein-Westfalen, Germany.

       Flight Sergeant Robert L. Melville, 21, was killed on November 17, 1944.  He was buried in Brookwood   Military Cemetery, Surrey, England.  His parents lived in Ottawa.

       Flying Officer Francis W. Moffit, 21, was killed on August 17, 1944, just 6 days after his birthday.  He was buried in the Kiel War Cemetery, Schleswig-Holstein, Germany.  His parents lived in Ottawa.

        Warrant Officer Z. Manford Niblock, 20, of the Royal Canadian Air Force, was killed on February 18, 1943.  He was buried in the Great Bircham (St. Mary) Churchyard, Norfolk, England.  His parents lived in Ottawa.  His father was the Clerk of Session at Dominion United Church.

       Flying Officer Orville S. Peck, 21, was killed on November 11, 1943.  He was buried in the St. Desir War Cemetery, Calvados, France.  

       Dennis V. Pickersgill is remembered on the Dominion United Church Memorial tablet but his name cannot be found in the records at Library & Archives Canada or in the on-line database of the  Commonwealth War Graves Commission.

       Flight Sergeant David P. Roberts, 21, was lost in action on July 22, 1943.  His name is recorded at the Runnymede Memorial, Surrey, England.  His parents lived in Ottawa.

       Flying Officer Dennis E. Roberts, 23, was killed on June 01, 1944.  He was buried in the Adegem  Canadian War Cemetery, Oost-Vlaanderen, Belgium.  His parents lived in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. 

       Warrant Officer Class II James A. Smart, 22, was killed on November 22, 1943.  He was buried in the         Berlin 1939-1945 War Cemetery, Berlin, Germany.

       Pilot Officer John N. Treadwell, 25, was killed on February 26, 1943.  His name is recorded at the Ottawa Memorial in Ottawa, where his wife and parents were living.

             

Honour Roll

Members or Adherents of Chalmers United Church:

 

                                                 

 

       Captain Grant F. Amy, was 35 years old when he was killed in Italy on December 22, 1943 while serving with the Canadian Army.  He was buried in the Moro River Canadian War Cemetery.  His wife lived in Ottawa

       Lieutenant Thomas E. Body, 27, was killed on April 13, 1943 while on active service in the Canadian Army.  He was buried in Brockwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, England.  He had been a member of the Chalmers Church Choir. 

       Flying Officer Gordon D. Bowes, 23, was killed in a plane crash in England on May 31, 1945, shortly after the end of the war.  He was buried in Brockwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, England.  His brother, F/O Allan C. Bowes was seriously wounded in Italy in 1943 but recovered.  Their mother lived in Ottawa.

       Flight Sergeant Carl S. Carruthers, 21, was killed in action on March 09, 1942.  He was buried in the   Apeldoorn General Cemetery, Gelderland, Netherlands.   

       Flight Sergeant Ford R. Carruthers, 20, was lost on a flight over Germany on September 07, 1942.  His memory in honoured at the Runnymede Memorial in Surrey, England.  Carl and Ford Carruthers were brothers whose parents lived in Ottawa.

       John C. Edwards, 25, a Second Lieutenant in the Army, drowned accidentally on May 18, 1940.  He was buried in Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa.  His parents lived in Ottawa.

       Leading Aircraftman Joseph H, Golding, was accidentally killed in England on August 08, 1944.  He was buried in Harrogate (Stonefall) Cemetery, Yorkshire, England.  His mother lived in Ottawa.

       Flight Lieutenant Francis (Frank) A. Halpin, 38, drowned on May 28, 1945.  He was buried in the Goose Bay Joint Services Cemetery, Newfoundland & Labrador.   His wife lived in Quebec City. 

       Lieutenant William H. Harrington, 26, was a graduate of Queen’s University in chemical engineering             who enlisted in the Royal Canadian Ordnance Corps in 1941.  He had participated in the 1943 invasion of Sicily and was killed in action in Italy on September 13, 1944.  He was buried in the Gradara Cemetery, San Giovanni, Italy.  His parents lived in Ottawa.                                                                                                              

       Warrant Officer Harold A. Healey, 24, was killed on a flight over           

              Germany on April 09, 1943.  He was buried in the Amsterdam     

              New Eastern Cemetery, Noord-Holland, Netherlands. 

       Warrant Officer Calvert H. Hunter, 31, was killed during flying operations on February 20, 1944.  He was buried in Brockwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, England.  He enlisted in the R.C.A.F. in November, 1940 receiving his wings as a sergeant-pilot in October 1941.  He went overseas the following month and was attached to the R.A.F., piloting Spitfires prior to his transfer to Lancaster bombers.  His mother lived in Ottawa. 

       Captain Edward G. Jamieson, 42, served overseas with the Canadian Army from 1940 to 1944.  He returned to Canada in September 1944 and died on May 09, 1945 after a lengthy illness.  He was buried in Beechwood Cemetery, Ottawa.  His wife and children lived in Ottawa.

       Captain Edward H. W. Lambart was serving in the Canadian Army in Italy when he was killed in action on December 17, 1943.  He was buried in the Moro River Canadian War Cemetery in Italy.  Edward Lambart had been a member of the Chalmers Church choir.    

       Flying Officer Frederick A. H. Lambart served with the R.C.M.P. for five years before joining the Royal Air Force in 1937.  He was an R.A.F. flight instructor when he was killed at age 29 in an aircraft accident in England on August 13, 1940.  He was buried in Bassingbourn Cum Kneesworth Cemetery, Cambridgeshire, England.  Edward and Frederick Lambart were brothers; their father lived in Ottawa.

       Flying Officer Allan G. Lillico, 33, was employed at the National Research Council and was tenor soloist in the Chalmers Church Choir before enlisting in the R.C.A.F. in 1942.  A navigator, Allan Lillico was killed in action at Abington, England on March 14, 1944.  He was buried in Oxford (Botley) Cemetery, Oxfordshire, England.  Two of his brothers also served in the Air Force; their

father lived in Britannia.

       Flying Officer R. Norman McCleery, 28, worked for the Federal District Commission prior to his enlistment with the R.C.A.F. in 1941.  In 1942, he went overseas where he was attached to the R.A.F. bomber command as an Air Observer.                                                                                                            

 Initially reported as  “missing”, the International Red Cross subsequently reported that  he had been killed in action on December 17, 1942 and had been buried in a military cemetery in Holland, now listed as Texel (Den Burg) Cemetery, Noord Holland, Netherlands. His parents lived in Ottawa.                                                                  

       Lieutenant Colonel Ruggles B. Pritchard, 44, was the Commanding Officer at the North Bay Training Centre when he died on February 07, 1941.  He was buried at Pinecrest Cemetery, Ottawa.  His wife lived in Ottawa.

       Flying Officer M. Esmond L. Scovell, 33, held a B. Comm. degree.  He was killed in Wiltshire, England on February 19, 1945.  He was buried in Brockwood Military Cemetery, Surrey, England.  He was survived by a sister in Bracebridge and a brother in Toronto. 

       Trooper Edward M. Stroulger, 28, was serving with the Royal Canadian Army Corps when he was killed in Holland campaign on January 21, 1945.  He was buried in the Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery, Gelderland, Netherlands.  His parents lived in Ottawa. 

       Lieutenant John K. C. Wallace, 23, was a graduate of Queen’s University who had sung in the Chalmers Church Choir prior to enlisting in the Canadian Army.  He was killed in action on April 25, 1944 while serving with an armored regiment in Italy.  He was buried there in the Casino War Cemetery.  His parents lived in Ottawa. 

       Warrant Officer Godfrey P. White, 37, of the R.C.A.F. was presumed missing in January and February,  1944.  His death was officially recorded as occurring on January 27, 1944 presumably during a flight over Europe.   His memory is honoured at the Runnymede Memorial in Surrey, England.  His mother lived in Ottawa.